Natural Probiotics and Superfood

Long before freezers and canning machines were available people in ancient times knew how to preserve fruits and vegetables in season for the long winters when food was scarce.

The fermentation process was accomplished through lacto-fermentation, converting the sugars into lactic-acid and giving the fermented foods its characteristic sour taste. It is also a natural preservative and inhibits putrefying bacteria, preventing these foods from rotting. Vegetables and fruits are converted into lactic acid by its many lactic acid producing bacteria. These lactobacilli are ubiquitous and are present on the surface of all living things and especially plentiful on all leaves and plants growing near the ground.

This makes some vegetables such as cabbage, cucumbers and beets ideal for the many digestive issues. Sauerkraut (sour white cabbage) or cabbage juice has a long history of providing benefits for a variety of health conditions.

This superfood is made from finely shredded cabbage and salt which preserves the cabbage for the first few days while the probiotic bacteria begin to grow. These probiotic bacteria are extremely beneficial to human digestion and are the mechanism that turns cabbage into a super nutritious food. Naturally fermented sauerkraut does not contain vinegar, the sour taste comes from the process of fermentation.

 

Born With A Silver Spoon

Most people know the saying “Born with a silver spoon”. This means that the child would never want for anything. Since the 17th century the silver spoon symbolizes great fortune and privilege and prosperous individuals would present them to newborns.

The ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome have known for thousands of years that silver had anti-bacterial properties and used silver to control bodily infections and prevent food spoilage. Early American settlers dropped silver coins into their milk to kill bacteria and to keep it fresh until use.

Throughout the “Middle Ages” in Europe, it had been noticed that royalty, who consumed most of their food and drink from silver tableware, utensils and cups, tended to develop a bluish skin tone (Blue bloods). That was due to the silver that entered their bodies during consumption.

Furthermore the lower rate of plague related deaths among royalty led to the inference that silver has protective properties.

Silver Kills Bacteria

BabyVirtually anyone reading this probably had a drop of silver nitrate dropped into their eyes after birth, which became standard practice at the end of the 19th century to prevent blindness, in the event that the mother had a venereal disease.

During the 14th century in Europe about 25% of the total population died from the Bubonic Plague which swept the continent. Only the Gypsies seemed to be immune from the ravages due to their practices of using small amounts of ground-up silver in their veins.

Silver kills bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and mold. Silver is a powerful natural anti-biotic and was used to prevent and treat infections in the late 19th and early 20th century for a variety of ailments. However in the early 1940’s the medical profession turned its attention to pharmaceuticals drugs and ant-biotics.

Silver is an important trace mineral and minute particles were found in soil before it became depleted by overuse and now the only way to get silver one needs is in liquid form. There has never been a reported allergic or toxic reaction. Excess silver may be deposited in the skin and tissue and can cause discoloration.

Antibiotics and Bacterial/Viral Infections

Anti-biotics and Bacterial/Viral InfectionsOften the label bacteria or virus are used interchangeably, although there is a significant difference between the two forms.

The biggest difference between viruses and bacteria is that viruses must have a living host – like a plant, animal or human – to multiply, while most bacteria can grow on non-living surfaces. Bacteria are intracellular organisms (they live in-between cells), whereas viruses are intracellular organisms (they live inside the cell).

Antibiotics can kill bacteria but not viruses.  An example of a disease caused by bacteria is strep throat and an example of a viral infection is the flu.

Bacteria are single-celled micro-organisms and carry all the necessary material needed for their growth and reproduction. Bacteria usually reproduce asexually – meaning that each cell divides into new, genetically identical cells, with each cell functioning as an independent unit. This process is known as binary fission and each cell will continue to multiply until the growth condition diminishes. The population growth curve for bacteria is an exponential curve, whereby with each generation the number of bacteria doubles and under ideal circumstances a single E.coli bacterium can grow to more than one million bacteria in as little as three and a half hours. For one Mycobacterium tuberculosis to generate the same number, again under ideal circumstances, may take as long as ten days.

Viruses are sub-microscopic particles and are the smallest and simplest life form known, they are 10 to 100 times smaller than bacteria. Opinions differ on whether viruses are actually a form of life, or organic structures that interact with living organisms, without a cellular structure or their own metabolism, they need a host cell to reproduce. Once inside a cell they reproduce millions of copies the cell will burst and the newly created viruses are in search of another living organism to infiltrate. Viruses may cause systemic infections. Vaccines and anti-viral medication help to slow the reproduction of the virus but it is difficult to eliminate. All viruses are harmful.  Read more…

The Eruption of Teeth and Bacteria

The presents of nutrients, soft tissue and secretions make the mouth a favorite habitat for a great variety of bacteria. At birth, the oral cavity is composed solely of the soft tissue of the lips, cheeks, tongue and palate which are kept moist by the secretions of the salivary glands. The eruption of teeth during the first year leads to the colonization of some bacteria which require a non-epithelial (non-soft) surface and will inhabit this area for as long as teeth remain.

The creation of the supporting structure of the teeth increases the habitat for the variety of microbial species.

The complexity of the oral flora continues to increase with time, with more varieties to colonize around puberty. These bacteria benefit their host who provides nutrition and an ideal environment for these micro-organisms and these normally occurring bacteria make it more difficult for unfriendly invaders to become established.

Aging and menopause can bring oral health problems – the same processes that lead to loss of bone in the spine and hips can also lead to loss of the alveolar bone of the jaws, resulting in periodontal disease, loose teeth, and subsequently tooth loss.

To prevent serious damage, regular dental examinations and professional cleaning to remove bacterial plaque under the gum-line and daily oral hygiene practices are essential, including brushing, flossing and rinsing with salt-water solutions.  Read more…