How Long Will You Live – 3 Tests

hMost people have a desire to live life to the fullest with a combination of quantity and quality.

There are many parameters that may determine how long you live, however, this short article presents the findings of five researchers who identified three simple tests you can do at home to measure your ability to increase years to your life.

The medical paper published in the British Medical Journal in 2014 revealed a 13 year study where they took 1,355 men and 1,411 women in 1999 when they were 53 years old and then checked to see who was alive and well 13 year later in 2012.

The following are the three tests that were evaluated.

Standing on one leg with your eyes closed for 10 seconds or longer, having a strong grip, and being able to stand up and sit back down in a chair many times in a minute.

According to the researchers of this paper, these tests clearly represented tell-tale signs of longevity.

Performed well in all three tests at age 53 or so and you should be healthy and vibrant 13 years later, when you are 66.

Researcher from University College London estimate that a 53 year old who can complete these tests successfully is up to 5 times more likely to be alive and well at 66 than someone who couldn’t complete the tests or who did them poorly.

Officially the tests are called the Chair Test (Standing up and sitting down in a chair 39 times in a minute for a man, and 36 times for a woman), the balance test (standing on one leg for 10 seconds or longer with eyes closed), and the grip test (ability to apply a pressure of up to 54.5 kg)

Compliments: www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com

The Eruption of Teeth and Bacteria

The presents of nutrients, soft tissue and secretions make the mouth a favorite habitat for a great variety of bacteria. At birth, the oral cavity is composed solely of the soft tissue of the lips, cheeks, tongue and palate which are kept moist by the secretions of the salivary glands. The eruption of teeth during the first year leads to the colonization of some bacteria which require a non-epithelial (non-soft) surface and will inhabit this area for as long as teeth remain.

The creation of the supporting structure of the teeth increases the habitat for the variety of microbial species.

The complexity of the oral flora continues to increase with time, with more varieties to colonize around puberty. These bacteria benefit their host who provides nutrition and an ideal environment for these micro-organisms and these normally occurring bacteria make it more difficult for unfriendly invaders to become established.

Aging and menopause can bring oral health problems – the same processes that lead to loss of bone in the spine and hips can also lead to loss of the alveolar bone of the jaws, resulting in periodontal disease, loose teeth, and subsequently tooth loss.

To prevent serious damage, regular dental examinations and professional cleaning to remove bacterial plaque under the gum-line and daily oral hygiene practices are essential, including brushing, flossing and rinsing with salt-water solutions.  Read more…