Alzheimer’s Disease – Memory and Cognition

brain-imageA walnut looks like the brain, has a left and right hemisphere, upper cerebrums and lower cerebellums. The folds and wrinkles of a walnut resembles to human organ: the brain. The shape of the nut even approximates the body part, looking like it has left and right hemispheres. And it’s no surprise walnuts are nicknamed “brain food”—they have a very high content of omega-3 fatty acids, which help support brain function.” The wrinkles and folds mimic the neo-cortex.

Walnuts develop over three dozen neuron-transmitters for brain function. They may also help head off dementia. Recent study found that walnut extract broke down the protein-based plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease. They found walnuts reversed some signs of brain aging in rats. Walnuts also appear to enhance signaling within the brain and encourage new messaging links between brain cells

Fibrillar amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) is the principal component of amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Scientific studies suggest that walnuts may reduce the risk or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease by maintaining Abeta in the soluble form. Basically, walnuts had inhibited Abeta fibrillization. It is proposed that polyphenolic compounds (such as flavonoids) present in walnuts may be responsible for its anti-amyloidogenic activity.

 

 

Disclaimer

The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Grisanti and his functional medicine community. Dr. Grisanti encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. Visit www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com for more information on our training in functional medicine.